The Honest and Non-Bleeped Memoir of Celebrity Chef, Gordon Ramsay

The Honest and Non-Bleeped Memoir of Celebrity Chef, Gordon Ramsay

With Hell’s Kitchen now entering its 14th season, we’ve all grown accustomed to Gordon Ramsay’s special brand of scornful howling. However, if you’ve seen his more recent project, Master Chef Junior, or his Youtube home cookery courses, you’ll know the infamous celebrity chef and¬†restaurateur has a softer side.

His memoir, originally released as Humble Pie and repackaged for American audiences as Roasting in Hell’s Kitchen, goes a long way in explaining that dichotomy. This is a memoir best experienced when read by the author as you can still hear the frustration and grudging respect in his voice when he describes working under the British celebrity chef who helped him come up. “That donkey,” Ramsay spits, still bitter about the time his perfectly good sauces were thrown out by the original enfant terrible, Marco Pierre White, on an ego-trip rage.

Ramsay comes from a poor working class background with an unreliable father, which meant moving often and strained relationships with his siblings. He had to settle on catering school at 16 after an injury crushed his footballer dreams. Although he’s created a global empire and probably doesn’t need to keep screaming at the amateurs in Hell’s Kitchen, I think Humble Pie reveals the psyche of a man convinced that being the best is the only guarantee that everything won’t all go to shit.

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